Implementation

Gender and Social Inclusion

Kolaborasi Masyarakat dan Pelayanan untuk Kesejahteraan (KOMPAK) is an Australia-Indonesia Government Partnership to support the Government of Indonesia (GoI) to achieve its National Medium Term Development Plan (Rencana Pembangunan Jangka Menengah Nasional, RPJMN) 2015-2019 aims at reducing poverty by improving the quality and coverage of basic services, and by increasing off-farm economic opportunities for the poor and vulnerable.

Indonesia’s national development planning framework (2005-2025) includes the high-level vision of an independent, progressive, just, and prosperous Indonesia (mandiri, maju, adil dan makmur). ‘Just’ is defined as being free from all forms of discrimination or limitations, whether between individuals, on the basis of gender, or place of origin. RPJMN includes specific strategies to increase the capacity and participation of the community, including women, children, youth and persons withdisability through facilitation, training, and assistance in planning, implementation, and monitoring of rural development, as well as to strengthen the capacity of rural communities and indigenous peoples.[1]

President Joko Widodo’s vision and mission statement for Indonesia’s national development (Nawacita) and the RPJMN set national targets of stable economic growth at 6-8 percent per year, poverty reduction of 7-8 percent and the Gini coefficient decline to 0.36 by 2019[2]. The government has also set specific targets to improve the access and quality of basic services among the poorest 40 percent of the population.

The Australian government has stated a strong commitment to ‘being at the forefront of efforts to empower women and girls and promote gender equality in the Indo-Pacific region’. Gender equality and women’s empowerment is one of the six investment priorities for Australian Aid; hence more than 80 percent of all programs regardless of their objectives are required to effectively address gender issues in their implementation[3]. Furthermore, the Australian government is also committed to making a major contribution to improving the quality of life for people with disabilities in developing countries with the objective that the development efforts leave no one behind[4].

Thus KOMPAK has a strong direction and mandate from GOI and GOA perspectives for integrating Gender Equality and Social Inclusion (GESI) throughout facility activities.

This strategy outlines how KOMPAK will respond to the said high-level policy commitments. It has been developed within the framework of KOMPAK’s overall Strategic Performance and Measurement Framework. It is an ongoing progress, and will be updated and expanded as KOMPAK develops.

Approach & strategy

KOMPAK adopts a twin track approach to GESI. This involves:

  • GESI mainstreaming: This aims to ensure that GESI is an integral part of planning, preparation, implementation, monitoring, evaluation and reporting in all outcome areas.
  • GESI focused initiatives: These aim to address particular inequalities, identify and test promising strategies for replication, or otherwise inform future program development.

The purpose of this strategy is to identify opportunities and mechanisms to integrate GESI into KOMPAK interventions, through a twin track approach (see following). Table 2 outlines the main focus in relation to each of the EOFOs.

Table   GESI strategies in relation to KOMPAK’s EOFOs

End of Facility Outcome

Focus intervention

EOFO 1: Local government and service units better address the needs of basic services users

Ensure policy engagement includes GESI related analysis and relevant recommendations

Facilitate representation of women, people with disabilities, and other marginalised groups in local government and service delivery related policy and planning

Promote awareness to understand and to respond the disaggregated needs, particularly those of women, people with disabilities, and other marginalised groups in frontline service planning, delivery, and monitoring activities

EOFO 2: The poor and vulnerable benefit from improved village governance

Ensure policy engagement includes GESI related analysis and relevant recommendation

Promote attention to understand and to respond the disaggregated needs, particularly those of women, people with disabilities, and other marginalised groups in the village development planning processes.

Promote women’s leadership and participation in village development planning

The poor and vulnerable benefit from increased opportunities for off-farm employment and economic development

Ensure policy engagement includes GESI related analysis and relevant recommendations

Improve awareness to women’s labour force participation in relevant GOI policy and programs

Identify and test strategies or models for promoting economic opportunities for women


Theory of change

KOMPAK’s GESI Theory of Change is closely aligned with the over-arching KOMPAK theories of change, and is summarised as follows:

  • If fiscal transfer policies and budget allocation formulae are clearer, consider local diversity, AND they are better understood, the flow of funds to local governments and service units will be more appropriate to the local needs, including those of the poor, women, people with disability, vulnerable and other marginalized groups.
  • If district, sub-district, and village government better understand the needs of poor, women, people with disability, vulnerable and other marginalized groups AND they are supported through supervision and facilitation, THEN funds will be increasingly allocated to supporting service delivery and village development that aims to benefit the poor, women, and marginalised groups.
  • If there is increased engagement of the poor, women, people with disability, vulnerable and other marginalized groups, and supporting institutions such as CSOs, in village discussions, decision making and planning, THEN village decisions and plans will be more accountable to the needs and interests of these populations.
  • If KOMPAK facilitates identification and evidencing of various policies and programming decisions designed to benefit the poor, women, people with disability, vulnerable and other marginalized groups, AND can identify relevant champions in government and civil society, such initiatives will be implemented and over time, bring widespread benefits to those groups. Such initiatives may be related to service delivery models, community enterprises, and the enabling environment for economic development and off-farm employment opportunities.

 

[1] Bappenas (2014), Rencana Pembangunan Jangka Menengah Nasional [National Medium-term Development Plan, RPJMN] 2015–2019, GOI: Jakarta. p.6.

[2] Bappenas (2016), social protection and poverty reduction in Indonesia: toward comprehensive system, Vivi Yulaswati-Director of Poverty Reduction and Social Welfare, presentation material. p.6.

[3] Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade-Australian Government, 2016: Gender equality and women’s empowerment strategy. p.1.

[4] Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade-Australian Government, 2015: Development for all 2015-2020: Strategy for strengthening disability-inclusive development in Australia’s aid program. p.1.

 

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Gender Equality and Social Inclusion Strategy
  • 25 Jan 2017
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